Index to Chiropractic Literature
Index to Chiropractic Literature
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ID 26851
  Title Quality of reporting in chiropractic mixed methods research: A methodological review protocol
URL https://chiromt.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12998-021-00395-0
Journal Chiropr & Manual Ther. 2021 ;29(35):1-8
Author(s)
Subject(s)
Peer Review Yes
Publication Type Article
Abstract/Notes

Background: Mixed methods designs are increasingly used in health care research to enrich findings. However, little is known about the frequency of use of this methodology in chiropractic research, or the quality of reporting among chiropractic studies using mixed methods.

Objective: To quantify the use and quality of mixed methods in chiropractic research, and explore the association of study characteristics (e.g., authorship, expertise, journal impact factor, country and year of publication) with reporting quality.

Methods: We will conduct a systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Index to Chiropractic Literature to identify all chiropractic mixed methods studies published from inception of each database to December 31, 2020. Articles reporting the use of both qualitative and quantitative methods, or mixed qualitative methods, will be included. Pairs of reviewers will perform article screening, data extraction, risk of bias with the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool (MMAT), and appraisal of reporting quality using the Good Reporting of A Mixed Methods Study (GRAMMS) guideline. We will explore the correlation between GRAMMS and MMAT scores, and construct generalized estimating equations to explore factors associated with reporting quality.

Discussion: This will be the first methodological review to examine the reporting quality of published mixed methods studies involving chiropractic research. The results of our review will inform opportunities to improve reporting in chiropractic mixed methods studies. Our results will be disseminated in a peer-reviewed publication and presented publicly at conferences and as part of a doctoral thesis.

Author keywords: Study protocol — Mixed methods research —  Reporting quality —  Chiropractic —  Methodological review

Author affiliations: PCE, LM, MO, JWB: Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence and Impact, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; PCE, CC: Chiropractic Department, D'Youville College, Buffalo, New York, United States; PCE: Private Practice, Cambridge, Ontario, Canada; KJS, PSN: Department of Graduate Education and Research, Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; LM: Biostatistics Unit, Father Sean O'Sullivan Research Centre, St. Joseph's Healthcare-Hamilton, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; LM: Centre for the Development of Best Practices in Health, Yaundé, Cameroon; LM: Division of Global Health, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, South Africa;
MO: School of Public Health and Health Systems, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada; PSN: Care and Public Health Research Institute, Maastricht University, Maastricht, Netherlands; JVN, JWB: Department of Anesthesia, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada;
CAB: Department of Family Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; CAB: The Centre for Family Medicine Family Health Team, Kitchener, Ontario, Canada; RJC, JWB: Michael G. DeGroote National Pain Centre, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada;
JWB: Chronic Pain Centre of Excellence for Canadian Veterans, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
Corresponding author: Peter C Emary—emaryp@mcmaster.ca

This abstract is reproduced with the permission of the publisher; click on the above link for free full text.  Online access only. PubMed Record | PDF


 

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